Rethinking Canada: Canadian Studies and Study Abroad

  • Richard Beach
  • George Sherman
Keywords: Study Abroad, American students, Canada, Canadian Studies

Abstract

Americans have been studying “abroad” in Canada on a freelance basis for generations, and for many different reasons. Certain regions of Canada, for example, provide excellent, close-to-home opportunities to study French and/or to study in a French-speaking environment. Opportunities are available coast-to-coast for “foreign studies” in an English-speaking environment. Additionally, many students are interested in visiting cities or areas from which immediate family members or relatives emigrated to the United States. 

Traditionally, many more Canadians have sought higher education degrees in the United States than the reverse. However, this is about to change. Tearing a creative page out of the American university admissions handbook, Canadian universities are aggressively recruiting in the United States with the up-front argument that a Canadian education is less expensive, and a more subtle argument that it is perhaps better.

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Author Biographies

Richard Beach

Richard Beach is Distinguished Service Professor and the former Director of the Center for the study of Canada and the Center for International Programs and Exchanges at Plattsburgh State University of New York. He is President of the American Council for Quebec Studies, and the recipient of the Donner Medal in Canadian Studies from the Association for Canadian Studies in the U.S. He has also received the 1996 Certificate of Merit from the International Council for Canadian Studies. 

George Sherman

George Sherman teaches economics and government at the secondary school level and is the Associate for Outreach at the Center for the Study of Canada, Plattsburgh State University of New York, where for 19 years he has co-edited Teaching Canada, an annual journal for educators. His publications include The Canada Connection in American History; Teaching About the Canadian Parliamentary System; O Canada (textbook), essays in the Center’s Occasional Papers series, and more than a dozen articles. He is active at regional and national conventions, workshops, academic conferences, and often comments on Canadian affairs in the media. 

References

Peter C. Newman. (1998). Titans: How the New Canadian Establishment Seized Power, Toronto: Viking. Penguin Books Canada, Ltd.
Published
2000-12-15
How to Cite
Beach, R., & Sherman, G. (2000). Rethinking Canada: Canadian Studies and Study Abroad. Frontiers: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, 6(1), 59-72. https://doi.org/10.36366/frontiers.v6i1.79